JohnsonHallUO

UO adopts senate task force recommendations

UO-CESV is heartened by President Coltrane’s response to the UO Senate Task Force to Address Sexual Violence and Survivor Support.

The adoption of these uncontroversial initial recommendations is a great first step. We hope that the response to the more difficult issues will be raised by the forthcoming campus climate survey and the recommendations the Senate Task Force will be making in late October will be as swift and decisive.

UO Message to Alums

This message was sent at 6:01 pm tonight to all UO alums.  It’s a very disappointing response to media coverage and does not do anything to alleviate the concerns we have about UO administrators’ priorities.

Dear Alumni and Friends,

KATU-TV aired a story series about the university and as an important friend of the UO we want you to have the most accurate information in case you get questions.

There are multiple errors in this story including inaccurate information about law enforcement activities, dates that should not be correlated to one another, and misrepresentation of the expertise of a retired UO faculty member.

The university took appropriate action when allegations were reported, and we are confident that our steps were necessary to ensure campus safety and integrity of criminal processes.

The story misrepresented the communication between the university and Eugene Police Department. EPD’s communications director Melinda McLaughlin told the reporter that EPD asked the university not to do anything that would compromise the investigation. The UO honored that request, and the police department was grateful.

The story hypothesizes that the university’s actions were driven by the NCAA-required Academic Progress Rate, or APR. This is inaccurate and that fact was conveyed to KATU. APR is calculated on a rolling four-year average with the latest data from a previous year, which makes transfers or scholarship non-renewals have significantly less impact than characterized by the story.

The story also tries to connect departures by former President Gottfredson, a chief human resources officer and general counsel as part of its timeline. The changes in leadership used in the news story are unrelated to one another and should not be connected in this manner.

Please visit the UO’s news website for facts regarding the university’s actions and thank you for your ongoing support of UO.

UO Public Affairs Communications

Response: KATU Story on UO’s Athletic Priorities

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UO-CESV Protest at the University of Oregon, Spring 2014

KATU’s recent report on sexual assault at the University of Oregon confirms our suspicions that administrators prioritized the needs of the basketball team over the safety of its students.

We are grateful to journalists in Oregon and nationally who are helping us shine a light on sexual violence on college campuses. Like KATU, members of UO-CESV have been struggling to get data about sexual assault at the University of Oregon. We remain concerned about inconsistencies in how reporting of sexual assaults are handled and our university administration’s continuing refusal to make public records concerning sexual assault on our campus.

With a new interim president and interim provost, we have the opportunity to move forward as a community – truthfully and transparently – in an effort to help us understand how and where our community has failed the young women who go to school here. We urge alumna of UO, faculty members, students, staff, and members of the broader Eugene community to join us in urging the leaders of our university to confront this problem directly and provide answers to a community that is increasingly appalled by the sexual violence that continues to take place on our campus and an administrative response that puts the economic interests of UO athletics above the safety and education of young women.

We are grateful to journalists in Oregon and nationally who are helping us shine a light on sexual violence on college campuses. In response to KATU’s recent report [add link], we remain concerned about inconsistencies in how reporting of sexual assaults are handled and our university administration’s continuing refusal to make public records concerning sexual assault on our campus. Moreover, addressing sexual violence on our campus should not mean hiring high-priced and ethically dubious firms like Brett Sokolov’s National Center for Higher Education Risk Management Group. Our university’s focus on risk management may be good for NCHERM’s business, but a risk management approach has not translated into effective prevention efforts or adequate funding for those.

With a new interim president and interim provost, we have the opportunity to move forward as a community – truthfully and transparently – in an effort to help us understand how and where our community has failed the young women who go to school here. We urge alumna of UO, faculty members, students, staff, and members of the broader Eugene community to join us in urging the leaders of our university to confront this problem directly and provide answers to a community that is increasingly appalled by the sexual violence that continues to take place on our campus.

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Bystander Story: 5/14/2014

Last night May 12th I worked at a Sorority/Fraternity event Anchor Splash. This was a charity event talent show that had the sororities and fraternities competing against one another. I have also worked similar events at OSU and have never seen anything as blatantly misogynistic as this event. this was my first event of this type at Oregon. I was deeply disturbed at the misogyny and homophobia expressed at this event. Most of the fraternities included members dressed up as women and held up to ridicule. I understand that some of this should be expected at an event of this kind but one frat went too far. They had a secession of “women” approach a man who then proceeded to reject them by pretending to strike each one until he found one acceptable. Violence- even pretend violence against women has no place in a University setting. I’m sorry that I can’t tell you which of the teams it was as I wasn’t keeping track of who was who. It is precisely this condoning of violence against women that contributes to the rape culture prevalent in society. They obviously felt comfortable expressing these views in public in spite of the events in the last couple of weeks. I found your website and decided to share my concerns.

KatQuina2008

Letters to the editor (Kathryn Quina, Ph.D.,)

Letters to the editor (Kathryn Quina, Ph.D.,)

UO VP Robin Holmes recently rejected a request for support for professor Jennifer Freyd’s survey of experiences and perceptions of the UO campus climate. This study has the interest and shared surveys of a U.S. Senate committee and a White House task force, who asked Dr. Freyd to assist in piloting their work. I am sure they are intrigued by the university’s response.

I have published survey development and research on abuse and related topics for more than 30 years. I reviewed the measures in the current survey, several used in my own work. There is nothing unusual, unethical or problematic about the proposed study, and it asks important questions about the impacts of institutional and interpersonal betrayal.

To attack this project for an imagined potential for bias by Freyd further diminishes an administration embarrassed by recent decisions, in local and national press accounts. That scandal occurred after this project was in development; Freyd’s advocacy is the logical result of her many years of widely respected scholarly work. If a famed cancer scientist used her data to testify against smoking, would her research now be criticized? If a professor who had authored a scholarly book on disabilities then advocated for his autistic son, would his work be recast as “biased”?

Scholars around the country are watching with concern that faculty and students who dare to speak out at UO will fall victim to suppression and criticism. Please keep us informed by your reporting.

Kathryn Quina, Ph.D., Hope, R.I.

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: Kathryn Quina is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and a professor of psychology and gender and women’s studies and associate dean at the Feinstein Providence Campus of the University of Rhode Island.

to raise awareness about sexual violence on our campus, and advocate for a safe and equitable educational experience.

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